Assessing the Impact of Transit Stations on Urban Socio-economic and Spatial Patterns in Kuala Lumpur.

Sabri, Soheil and Muhammad Ludin, Ahmad Nazri and Johar, Foziah (2012) Assessing the Impact of Transit Stations on Urban Socio-economic and Spatial Patterns in Kuala Lumpur. In: Conference On Urban Planning & Management in Malaysia, 8 Nov 12, Renaissance Hotel, Kuala Lumpur.

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Abstract

In order to reduce auto-dependency and environmental imprint for a sustainable development, the urban transit facility should be well distributed for all socio-economic groups. To achieve this, perhaps one of the most effective approaches is adopting the transit-oriented development (TOD) principles. However, in an unplanned urban transit development there is a major concern that the distribution of transit facilities is not following an equal urban socio-economic and spatial pattern. Since this issue has been little discussed in the literature, the current study looks at the influence of transit station on socio-economic, land use, and housing type distribution in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. A spatial analysis framework was developed for analyzing the pattern of household characteristics (i.e., size, education, age), land use (i.e., commercial, residential, entertainment, institutional), and housing type (i.e., low-cost, medium-cost, high-cost). The attributes of variables have been retrieved from various data sources for two distance areas of one quarter mile (approx. 400 meters) and half a mile (approx. 800 meters) radius around Putra Light Rail Train (LRT) transit stations. The preliminary findings indicate that, high profile socio-economic households and high and medium-cost housing types are significantly clustered in areas at one quarter mile radius around transit stations. The land use types also are more economical in this distance. The findings imply that low income households are residing in further distances from transit stations and there is a spatial mismatch between urban transit facilities and low income households, as well as low-cost housing types. These findings enhance our understanding on planning for social and spatial equity. So that, if the development is inclined with TOD principles there would be less spatial mismatch in achievement of sustainability.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Uncontrolled Keywords: TOD, Spatial equity, Sustainable development, Spatial analysis, Kuala Lumpur
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
Divisions: Faculty of Built Environment > Urban and Regional Planning
Depositing User: FAB IR Admin
Date Deposited: 24 Jun 2013 06:01
Last Modified: 24 Jun 2013 06:02
URI: http://epublication.fab.utm.my/id/eprint/334

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